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Contact Info


Honor Construction of Brevard,LLC.

1103 W Hibiscus Blvd
Ste. 311
Melbourne, FL  32901

Email: Contact@
HonorConstruction.com

Phone:
(321) 327-2950

Fax: (321) 914-0903


National Association of Certified Home Inspectors


Honor Construction Inspection Service is teaming up with Sharon Bunce of Keller Williams Realty.
We will be at an open house located at 598 Empire Ave Palm Bay, this Sunday October 4th, starting at 12:00.
We will be there to answer any questions and concerns you may have. Also offering discounts on wind mitigation services, which can
greatly reduce your insurance premiums. Come see us! Refreshments will be served.



My Insurance company wants a four point inspection... What is a Four point inspection?

A four point inspection is usually requested by your insurance company when starting a new homeowner's policy. The house is usually
older, some companies require it as new as twenty years and some as old as fifty years. The four points they want to look at are roof,
electrical, plumbing and heating/air conditioning. This is a limited visual inspection of components the insurance company my find unsafe
or problematic. The following is a list of questions we answer and items we look at:


Type of home:
Type of construction:
Type of foundation:
Number of stories:
Approximate square feet:
Approximate total living area:
Approximate age of home:



Types of cooling systems:
Estimated age of cooling systems:
Cooling systems upgraded? Year?
Condition of cooling system:
Cooling system comments:

Number of bathrooms:
Main supply line material:
Main waste/vent material:
Fixture supply line material:
Fixture drain line material:
Shut off valves present:
Water heater location?
Water heater fuel type?
Approximate age of water heater:
TPR valve present?
Fire sprinkler system present?
Freeze hazards noticed?
Polybutylene noticed?
Plumbing leaks noticed?
Recent plumbing upgrades? Year?
Overall plumbing condition:
Plumbing comments:






It is important to remember that this is a limited visual inspection and does not replace an home inspection, such as for a purchase or sale
(listing inspection).

Wind Mitigation - save money on homeowners insurance- it is the law  

Wind Mitigation is a way of preventing wind damage to a structure. Florida Law states that insurance companies are required to give you
discounts on homeowner's insurance if the insured building is protected by features that will prevent damage to the structure during a
storm. There are eight areas in particular that insurance companies look at to determine the potential of a discount on insurance ; the roof
covering, roof deck, secondary water barriers, roof truss attachment, roof shape, wall construction type and opening protection.

The insurance company usually receives this information via a report. This report is called a Uniform Wind Mitigation Verification
Inspection, or also known as an "1802" form. The 1802 form can be used for up to five years. However, if you change any item that is
listed on the report such as installing a new roof then it is highly recommended that you obtain a current 1802 form to submit to your
insurance agent. The 1802 form can be completed by a Licensed Contractor, Engineer, Architect, or through an inspector employed by a
Wind Certification entity through the “My Safe Florida Home Program”.

In the past the state paid for these inspections, however, that program has ended and now an owner must incur the cost of the
inspection by his or herself. Typically the homeowner will pay anywhere from $75.00 to $150.00 to have this inspection completed by a
qualified individual. As with anything BUYER BEWARE and make sure the person completing your 1802 form is a qualified individual
who meets the above criteria, and is allowed to complete your form. Otherwise you could pay an inspector to complete the form only to
have your insurance company refuse it! With my next blog

Section one of the wind mitigation 1802 form wants to know about the year of the roof covering replacement.

The Office of insurance regulation is very clear on this one, they want to know the date it was permitted.
This tells them one of three choices:
1. At a minimum meets the 2001 Florida Building Code or the 1994 South Florida Building Code.... Read More
2. Does not meet the above minimum requirements.
3. Unknown or Undetermined.

The date must be March 1st 2002 or later. This is the date that the 2001 Florida Building code took effect. If the date is prior to March
1st 2001 it would not meet the 2001 building code or unknown. Unknown in most cases would make the form useless to most insurance
companies. I will not fill out the form if it can not be determined. The best place to find the date would be a receipt or the local building
department. This is one of the greatest reasons to get a wind mitigation done. More later on the next sections.

Section one of the wind mitigation 1802 form wants to know about the year of the roof covering replacement.

The Office of insurance regulation is very clear on this one, they want to know the date it was permitted.
This tells them one of three choices:
1. At a minimum meets the 2001 Florida Building Code or the 1994 South Florida Building Code.... Read More
2. Does not meet the above minimum requirements.
3. Unknown or Undetermined.

The date must be March 1st 2002 or later. This is the date that the 2001 Florida Building code took effect. If the date is prior to March
1st 2001 it would not meet the 2001 building code or unknown. Unknown in most cases would make the form useless to most insurance
companies. I will not fill out the form if it can not be determined. The best place to find the date would be a receipt or the local building
department. This is one of the greatest reasons to get a wind mitigation done. More later on the next sections.

Roof Deck Attachment: What is the weakest form of roof deck attachment?
We have five choices is this category

Plywood/OSB roof sheathing attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24” o.c.) by 6d nails spaced at 6” along the edge
and 12” in the field. -OR- Batten decking supporting wood shakes or wood shingles.-OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other
deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift resistance of 55 psf.

Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of ½” attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24” o.c.) by 8d
nails spaced 6” along the edge and 12” in the field.-OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesives, other deck fastening system or
truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean uplift resistance of 103 psf.

Plywood/OSB roof sheathing with a minimum thickness of ½” attached to the roof truss/rafter (spaced a maximum of 24” o.c.) by 8d
nails spaced 6” along the edge and 6” in the field. -OR- Dimensional lumber/Tongue & Groove decking with a minimum of 2 nails per
board. -OR- Any system of screws, nails, adhesiives, other deck fastening system or truss/rafter spacing that has an equivalent mean
uplift resistance of 182 psf.

Reinforced Concrete Roof Deck.

The roof deck is the wood under the shingles. This could be plywood, oriented strained board(wafer board) or wood planking. Wood
planking is usually the strongest, but we are also looking at the nails holding down the roof. The nails could be from staples, 6D to 8D.
The pattern is also important, how close together they are.

Section 3 we are looking at:  Roof to Wall Attachment: What is the weakest roof to wall connection?

Toe Nail Rafter/truss anchored to top plate of wall using nails driven at an angle through the rafter/truss and attached to the top plate of
the wall.

Clips Metal attachments on every rafter/truss that are nailed to one side (or both sides in the case of a diamond type clip) of the
rafter/truss and attached to the top plate of the wall frame or embedded in the bond beam.

Single Wraps Metal Straps must be secured to every rafter/truss with a minimum of 3 nails, wrapping over and securing to the opposite
side of the rafter/truss with a minimum of 1 nail. The Strap must be attached to the top plate of the wall frame or embedded in the bond
beam in at least one place.

Double Wraps Both Metal Straps must be secured to every rafter/truss with a minimum of 3 nails, wrapping over and securing to the
opposite side of the rafter/truss with a minimum of 1 nail. Each Strap must be attached to the top plate of the wall frame or embedded in
the bond beam in at least one place.

Structural Anchor bolts, structurally connected or reinforced concrete roof.

Unknown, unidentified or no attic access.

Sometimes you may have straps that do not wrap and these would be identified as clips. Some open beam construction may qualify for
"Structural Anchor bolt" discounts but the category is usually for multifamily buildings with concrete roofs.

Roof geometry can be the biggest discounts available on your wind premium. The form states:

Roof Geometry: What is the roof shape(s)? (Porches or carports that are not structurally connected to the main roof system are not
considered in the roof geometry determination)

-Hip Roof Hip roof with no other roof shhapes greater than 50% of any major wall length.

-Other Any other roof shape or combinatiion of roof shapes including hip, gable, flat, gambrel, mansard and other roof shapes.

A hip roof is a roof shaped like a pyramid, it slopes towards the center at all sides. If the roof has gable ends(triangle shapes) we need to
determine if they are braced properly, which is in section five of the report.

Gable End Bracing: For roof structures that contain gables, please check the weakest that apply:
-Gable End(s) are NOT braced.
-Gable End(s) are braced at a minimum inn accordance with the 2001 Florida Building Code.
-Not applicable, unknown or unidentifiedd.

There are several ways to braces gable ends, the resulting would prevent the gable from separating from the wall that it sits on. This is
usually done by attaching the gable end truss to the other trusses in either an "x" bracing or continuous horizontal brace every four feet.

Wind Mitigation - saving money on insurance continued  

The last three sections of the Wind Mitigation is for Construction, Secondary Water Barrier and Opening protection.

House are not always one construction type.   Typically an addition may be another kind of construction like concrete block or frame.  
The OIR form wants us to specify the percentage of each, although they may not be readly visible.

Wall Construction Type: Check all wall construction types for exterior walls of the structure and percentages for each:
Wood Frame _________% Un-Reinforced Masonry _________%Reinforced Masonry _________% Poured Concrete _________%
Other: ___________ _________%

A secondary water barrier is usually under shingles and is sometimes called peel and stick.  This could be in a tape, placed to seam the
seams of the wood roof.  Felt paper could be replaced with a self adhering roll roofing material that covers the entire roof. Some foams
sprayed under the roof will qualify also.

Secondary Water Resistance (SWR): (standard underlayments or hot mopped felts are not SWR)
SWR Self adhering polymer modified bitumen roofing underlayment applied directly to the sheathing or foam SWR Barrier (not foamed
on insulation) applied as a secondary means to protect the dwelling from water intrusion.

Opening protection also called shutters can also lower insurance rates.  We are looking at the weakest or least amount of protection on
the openings of the building.  Openings include doors, windows, skylights, sidelights and garage doors.  The best discounts come to
those that have all openings covered with impact rated devices that meet the Florida building code or the Miami Dade code.

Opening Protection: What is the weakest form of wind borne debris protection installed on the structure? (Exterior openings include, but
are not limited to: windows, doors, garage doors, skylights, etc. Product approval may be required for opening protection devices
without proper rating identification)
Hurricane All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact
resistant glazing that meets the requirements of one of the following for “Large Missile Impact:
Miami-Dade County PA 201, 202 and 203
Florida Building Code TAS 201, 202 and 203
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996 (Missile Level C – 9 lb)
Basic All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact
resistant glazing that meets the requirements for “Small Missile Impact”.
Not Rated Only glazed openings are covered with; impact resistant coverings/products -OR- shutter protection devices manufactured
before 1994 that cannot be identified as Miami/Dade or FBC product approved. This rating also applies to wood structural panels that do
not meet the requirements of Section 1609 and Table 1609.1.4 of the 2004 FBC (2006 supplement).
Wood Panels Plywood/OSB meeting the requirements of Section 1609 and Table 1609.1.4 of the 2004 FBC (2006 supplement).
None One or more exterior openings are not covered

It takes  a trained and experienced inspector to know what qualifies and what does not.  An inspector should have taken a sanctioned
Wind Mitigation class and have experience in the building trade.  Most insurance companies want a Licensed Contractor either
Residential, Building or General Contractor to personally do the inspection.  If you get an wind mitigation it is prudent to check their
qualifications first, I have personally redone many inspections because they were rejected by the insurance company.  If you have any
questions please do not hesitate to contact me or Honor Construction.

This is a simple two page form that can save thousands of dollars a year in insurance premiums and if done before closing could
potentially greatly effect a buyers payments to escrow.  It always can be done after insurance is purchased but is very useful when
shopping for insurance.  I recommend having them done with the home inspection and four-point inspection if needed.

The last three sections of the Wind Mitigation is for Construction, Secondary Water Barrier and Opening protection.

A House is not always one construction type.   Typically an addition may be another kind of construction like concrete block or frame.  
The OIR form wants us to specify the percentage of each, although they may not be readly visible.

Wall Construction Type: Check all wall construction types for exterior walls of the structure and percentages for each:
Wood Frame _________% Un-Reinforced Masonry _________%
Reinforced Masonry _________% Poured Concrete _________%
Other: ___________ _________%

A secondary water barrier is usually under shingles and is sometimes called peel and stick.  This could be in a tape, placed to seam the
seams of the wood roof.  Felt paper could be replaced with a self adhering roll roofing material that covers the entire roof. Some foams
sprayed under the roof will qualify also.

Secondary Water Resistance (SWR): (standard underlayments or hot mopped felts are not SWR)
SWR Self adhering polymer modified bitumen roofing underlayment applied directly to the sheathing or foam SWR Barrier (not foamed
on insulation) applied as a secondary means to protect the dwelling from water intrusion.

No SWR

Opening protection also called shutters can also lower insurance rates.  We are looking at the weakest or least amount of protection on
the openings of the building.  Openings include doors, windows, skylights, sidelights and garage doors.  The best discounts come to
those that have all openings covered with impact rated devices that meet the Florida building code or the Miami Dade code.


Opening Protection: What is the weakest form of wind borne debris protection installed on the structure? (Exterior openings include, but
are not limited to: windows, doors, garage doors, skylights, etc. Product approval may be required for opening protection devices
without proper rating identification)
Hurricane All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact
resistant glazing that meets the requirements of one of the following for “Large Missile Impact:
Miami-Dade County PA 201, 202 and 203
Florida Building Code TAS 201, 202 and 203
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996 (Missile Level C – 9 lb)
Basic All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact
resistant glazing that meets the requirements for “Small Missile Impact”.
Not Rated Only glazed openings are covered with; impact resistant coverings/products -OR- shutter protection devices manufactured
before 1994 that cannot be identified as Miami/Dade or FBC product approved. This rating also applies to wood structural panels that do
not meet the requirements of Section 1609 and Table 1609.1.4 of the 2004 FBC (2006 supplement).
Wood Panels Plywood/OSB meeting the requirements of Section 1609 and Table 1609.1.4 of the 2004 FBC (2006 supplement).
None One or more exterior openings are not covered

It takes  a trained and experienced inspector to know what qualifies and what does not.  An inspector should have taken a sanctioned
Wind Mitigation class and have experience in the building trade.  Most insurance companies want a Licensed Contractor either
Residential, Building or General Contractor to personally do the inspection.  If you get an wind mitigation it is prudent to check their
qualifications first, I have personally redone many inspections because they were rejected by the insurance company.  If you have any
questions please do not hesitate to contact me or Honor Construction.

This is a simple two page form that can save thousands of dollars a year in insurance premiums and if done before closing could
potentially greatly effect a buyers payments to escrow.  It always can be done after insurance is purchased but is very useful when
shopping for insurance.  I recommend having them done with the home inspection and four-point inspection if needed

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