Honor Construction Inspection Service Blog

Brevard's Premier Inspection Company 321-327-2950

Wind Mitigation Secondary water barrier and opening protection

Secondary Water Resistance, on the wind mitigation form is referring to a second way of preventing water from entering through the roof. Some carriers will consider a concrete roof deck a secondary barrier but most will only give credit if it is a self adhering modified bitumen(peel and stick roofing). Proving it is applied is difficult because it is covered by the roofing material. Some carries will require a receipt with a reference to it. While others will require a picture. Pictures may be obtained from the attic space by looking at any roof penetrations or space between the roof deck. Care should be taken not to look in a roof valley as the valleys may be covered but not the rest of the roof. Only certain foams will provide a secondary water resistance and it will be necessary to obtain information from the installer.

8. Secondary Water Resistance (SWR): (standard underlayments or hot mopped felts are not SWR)
A. SWR Self adhering polymer modified bitumen roofing underlayment applied directly to the sheathing or foam adhesive SWR barrier (not foamed on insulation) applied as a secondary means to protect the dwelling
from water intrusion.
B. No SWR
C. Unknown or undetermined.

Opening protection or shutters is rather complicated and there are several choices. We are looking for protection of all windows or all openings. Most people forget about several openings in the homes envelope including skylights, side doors, garage doors and even doors that do not have glass. Contrary to most peoples belief, you do not have to leave a door or door uncovered as means of escape, although it may be prudent. There are systems available that will allow you to open them from the inside and provide protection.

For many years hurricane protection was totally unregulated and the standards have changed. Hurricane protection is usually rated as Impact resistant and follow strict testing protocols. The device than can be approved by either Miami-Dade or Florida Building Code(FBC). The only way to know what testing has been performed and who has approved it is by the Notice of Acceptance(NOA) and paperwork provided by the manufacturer or installer. Without the proper paper work it may be impossible to prove that they are an approved product.

9. Opening Protection: What is the weakest form of wind borne debris protection installed on the structure? (Exterior openings include, but are not limited to: windows, doors, garage doors, skylights, etc. Product approval may be required for opening protection devices without proper rating identification.)
A. All Exterior Openings (Glazed and Unglazed) All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as wind borne debris protection devices in the product approval system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements of one of the following for “Cyclic Pressure and Large Missile Impact”. For the HVHZ, systems must have either a Miami-Dade NOA or FBC Approval marked “For Use in the HVHZ”.
Miami-Dade County Notice of Acceptance (NOA) 201, 202 and 203. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
Florida Building Code Testing Application Standard (TAS) 201, 202 and 203. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
Southern Standards Technical Document (SSTD) 12. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
For Skylights Only: ASTM E 1886/E 1996. (Large Missile – 4.5 lb.)
For Garage Doors Only: ANSI/DASMA 115. (Large Missile – 9 lb.)
B. All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as windborne debris protection devices in the product approval system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements of one of the following for “Cyclic Pressure and Large Missile Impact”:
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Large Missile – 4.5 lb.)
SSTD 12. (Large Missile – 4 lb. to 8 lb.)
For Skylights Only: ASTM E 1886/E 1996. (Large Missile – 2 to 4.5 lb.)
C. All exterior openings are fully protected at a minimum with impact resistant coverings, impact resistant doors and/or impact resistant window units that are listed as windborne debris protection devices in the product approval system of the State of Florida or Miami-Dade County and meet the requirements of one of the following for “Cyclic Pressure and Small Missile Impact”:
Miami-Dade County NOA 201, 202 and 203. (Small Missile – 2grams)
Florida Building Code TAS 201, 202 and 203. (Small Missile – 2 grams)
ASTM E 1886 and ASTM E 1996. (Small Missile – 2 grams)
SSTD 12. (Small Missile – 2 grams)